5 Keys to Uncommon Email Prospecting Results

Image Credit rvidal, Flickr

This is a guest post from Kendra Lee of KLA Group. Follow her on Twitter for prospecting tips and tricks.

Remember the Glimpse Factor – it takes prospects three seconds or less to decide whether they want to read your email, have time to deal with it, or can delete it without any consequences. And since deep down they might want to get rid of it and get back to work, it’s up to you to make them feel like they need to respond right way.

So, if a prospect is going to read your email, much less respond, it needs to seem like it came from a colleague, not a faceless Internet marketing firm. The best way to get uncommon email results is definitely to avoid looking like the common email marketer.

Here are a few things to try to increase your response rate.

Image Credit rvidal, Flickr1. Write subject lines that invite a quick response. If your prospect can’t glean the purpose of your email from the headline, then it’s probably not going to make it through the delete barrier. I like to use something that sounds personal like: “Can you talk Monday at 2pm?” Of course your subject must relate to the body of your email, so if you ask for a meeting Monday at 2pm, make sure you ask again in your email.

2. Start your email with a statement, not a question. How many messages do you send to your customers that begin with a question? That’s right, none of them. Avoid the temptation to try to pique your prospect’s interest with this tactic – it just doesn’t work.

3. Use paragraphs rather than bullet points. This just tips contacts off to the fact that you’re trying to sell them something. While your real objective is to make the email easier to read, your prospect is thinking “sales person – delete!” Use bullets once you have a working relationship, but stay away from them in your prospecting emails.

4. Send your message without fancy graphics or headers. There’s nothing wrong with text, a few paragraphs, and a single link in your email message. Complicated layouts and pictures make it more likely that your note will be caught by a spam filter. And besides, how often do you put large graphic headers at the top of your client emails? The point is to look like you just dashed off a note to a colleague or customer, so forget the extras.

5. Write to another person. If your message doesn’t read like something that could be spoken naturally, you have a problem. The idea is to connect with your prospects on a personal level and invite them to take action, not convince them that you’re part of a faceless organization. Envision a customer and write your email as if you were sending it to him or her. Be sure that your message focuses on your prospects’ issues or triggering events, not on your company. That’s good selling advice in any situation, since customers care more about their needs than your generic solution features and benefits.

Keep revising your emails until you have something that sounds natural and customer-focused, because that’s what buyers – like all humans – respond to.

Kendra Lee is a top IT Seller, Prospect Attraction Expert and author of the award winning book “Selling Against the Goal” and president of KLA Group. Specializing in the IT industry, KLA Group works with companies to break in and exceed revenue objectives in the Small and Midmarket Business (SMB) segment. Ms. Lee is a frequent speaker at national sales meetings and association events. To find out more about the author, read her latest articles, or to subscribe to her newsletter visit www.klagroup.com or call +1 303.741.6636. 

 

Amplification

Image Credit Coastline Windows & Conservatories, Flickr

@JaniceMcCallum of Health Content Advisors submitted a comment about the amplification effect on content through social media, on our latest episode of Social Call:

“Gary, I particularly like your use of the word “amplify” to describe the value of social media. I use it often to describe how Twitter amplifies blog content and how the two cross-pollinate.

Image Credit Coastline Windows & Conservatories, FlickrAs was emphasized by all speakers on this podcast, there has to be existing content –preferably high quality content–to get value from amplification. So, companies should have a solid underlying media strategy before they jump into a social media campaign. In healthcare, where I spend most of my time now, I observe hospitals trying to establish social media programs when they have weak or non-existent content strategies. They need to ask themselves what they’re amplifying and if they don’t have a good answer, I suggest they focus on building the foundational message first.

OTOH, for publishers with quality content, they’re missing out if they’re not taking advantage of social media amplification.”

Listen to / read the full Social Call episode.


Chit Chat Group Finds Portland Oregon To Be #14 Socially Networked Cities!

NetProspex on Chit Chat Group

MARCH 23, 2011 BY Andy Gross

Thanks to Men’sHealth we now have a top 100 most socially networked cities in order.  Portland, Oregon is number 14!  If your business is not into social networking it may be a good time to start.

They did a great job with covering everything to show a great picture and to keep it fair.   First, Men’s Health figured outeach city’s LinkedIn and Facebook users per capita, and then tapped the NetProspex marketing database to figure out each location’s amount of overall Twitter usage. Not stopping there, the next step was to consult online ad network Chitika to quantify traffic from MySpace,Friendster, Reddit and Digg, and finally, SimplyMap helped determine the percentage of households using chat rooms and blogs.

 

Most socially networked
1 Washington, DC A+
2 Atlanta, GA A+
3 Denver, CO A+
4 Minneapolis, MN A+
5 Seattle, WA A+
6 San Francisco, CA A
7 Orlando, FL A
8 Austin, TX A
9 Boston, MA A
10 Salt Lake City, UT A-

11 Cincinnati, OH A-
12 Raleigh, NC A-
13 Burlington, VT A-
14 Portland, OR B+
15 Madison, WI B+
16 Dallas, TX B+
17 Portland, ME B
18 Sacramento, CA B
19 Aurora, CO B
20 Boise, ID B
21 Charlotte, NC B
22 Wilmington, DE B
23 Oakland, CA B
24 St. Louis, MO B
25 Las Vegas, NV B
26 Columbus, OH B
27 San Diego, CA B
28 San Jose, CA B
29 St. Paul, MN B-
30 Plano, TX B-
31 Tampa, FL B-
32 Nashville, TN B-
33 Los Angeles, CA B-
34 Phoenix, AZ B-
35 Newark, NJ B-
36 Miami, FL B-
37 Norfolk, VA C+
38 Richmond, VA C+
39 Chicago, IL C+
40 Durham, NC C+
41 Colorado Springs, CO C+
42 Des Moines, IA C+
43 Jersey City, NJ C+
44 Indianapolis, IN C+
45 Milwaukee, WI C+
46 Fargo, ND C+
47 Columbia, SC C+
48 Houston, TX C+
49 Philadelphia, PA C+
50 Birmingham, AL C+
51 Cleveland, OH C+
52 Kansas City, MO C
53 New York, NY C
54 Greensboro, NC C
55 Reno, NV C
56 Manchester, NH C
57 Providence, RI C
58 Baltimore, MD C
59 Little Rock, AR C
60 Louisville, KY C
61 Sioux Falls, SD C-
62 Omaha, NE C-
63 Pittsburgh, PA C-
64 Baton Rouge, LA C-
65 Lexington, KY C
66 Wichita, KS C-
67 Anchorage, AK C-
68 Lincoln, NE C-
69 Cheyenne, WY D+
70 New Orleans, LA D+
71 Tucson, AZ D+
72 Buffalo, NY D+
73 Honolulu, HI D+
74 Santa Ana, CA D+
75 Charleston, WV D+
76 Oklahoma City, OK D+
77 Virginia Beach, VA D+
78 Winston-Salem, NC D+
79 Tulsa, OK D+
80 Albuquerque, NM D
81 Fort Worth, TX D
82 San Antonio, TX D
83 Jackson, MS D
84 Chesapeake, VA D
85 Jacksonville, FL D
86 Riverside, CA D
87 Memphis, TN D-
88 St. Petersburg, FL D-
89 Toledo, OH D-
90 Corpus Christi, TX D-

Least socially networked
91 Billings, MT D-
92 Fort Wayne, IN D-
93 Bridgeport, CT D-
94 Detroit, MI D-
95 Fresno, CA F
96 Bakersfield, CA F
97 Lubbock, TX F
98 Stockton, CA F
99 Laredo, TX F
100 El Paso, TX F

Source: http://chitchatgroup.com/chit-chat-group-finds-portland-oregon-to-be-14-socially-networked-cities

 

 

 

 

Social Media Minute: Top Socially Connect Cities and LinkedIn Goes Big

NetProspex on CMSwire

By  (@harrisja)   Mar 23, 2011

Toronto was once called the Facebook capitol of the world. However, looking at the bigger picture of social networking, which city is the most active social media-heavy city in the United States? Men’s Health ranked the top 100 cities and reported back earlier this week.

To gauge the top cities, Men’s Heath checked each cities ranking on LinkedIn and Facebook per capita, and also looked at the NetProspex to weight each location’s Twitter usage. To round out the measure, Men’s Health utilized ad firm Chitika to analyze traffic from MySpace, Friendster, Reddit and Digg. The top city that was ranked was Washington, DC, followed by Atlanta and Denver. Surprisingly, the big city of New York, NY ranked low at number 53.

The Pacific Northwest (where I live) was strongly represented with Seattle ranking 5 and Portland, Oregon ranked number 14. Looking at the list, it seems that tech-heavy cities such as the Northwest and Silicon Valley are heavy users of social networking, whereas mid-west cities such as Milwaukee shy away from social networking. How did your city rank?  Do you agree or disagree with Men’s Health’s numbers and how they align with your cities’ perceived social networking use.

Read full article: http://www.cmswire.com/cms/enterprise-20/social-media-minute-top-socially-connect-cities-and-linkedin-goes-big-010637.php

Men’s Health names top 100 socially networked cities

NetProspex on SocialBarrel

By David John Walker posted Mar 20th 2011 4:49AM

Men’s Health employed a scientific and balanced procedure to carry out the daunting task of ranking the top 100 socially networked cities in the United States.

Men’s Health first determined the number of Facebook and LinkedIn users per capita and then assessed the amount of Twitter usage by using the NetProspex database. Next, the amount of traffic at MySpace, Digg, Reddit, and Friendster was determined by checking the online ad network Chitika.  Last, the number of households visiting chat rooms and blogs was quantified by using SimplyMap.

The Men’s Health rankings places the nation’s capital, Washington D.C. at the top of the list giving it bragging rights to call itself “The Capital of Social Networking”. Rounding out the top five, all with A+ ratings, are Atlanta, Denver, Minneapolis, and Seattle.  The bottom ten on the list of the most socially networked cities is categorized as “Least Socially Networked Cities” and here El Paso Texas is in the 100th position, followed by Laredo, Texas, Stockton, CA, Lubbock, Texas, and Bakersfield California, all with F ratings.

You can view the complete list here at Men’s Health.

Source: http://socialbarrel.com/men%E2%80%99s-health-names-top-100-socially-networked-cities/5093/

Crowd-sourcing Ideas: A Complete B2B Reading List

NetProspex on Mashable

March 19, 2011 by Charlie White

Anyone who wants to rank socially networked cities is going to be in for a fight. But the brave souls at Men’sHealth aren’t shying away from a tussle, placing the top 100 most socially networked cities in order for all to see.

How did they do it? It appears to be a fair and scientifically valid procedure. First, Men’s Health figured out each city’s LinkedIn andFacebook users per capita, and then tapped the NetProspexmarketing database to figure out each location’s amount of overall Twitter usage.

Not stopping there, the next step was to consult online ad network Chitika to quantify traffic from MySpace,FriendsterReddit and Digg, and finally, SimplyMap helped determine the percentage of households using chat rooms and blogs.

The list below is as much a study of how to find this information as it is a valid assessment of which city has the bragging rights to calling itself The Capital of Social Networking. Speaking of capital, who knew our nation’s capital, Washington, D.C., would be at the top of the list, or that Milwaukee (#45), the location ofMashable’s humble Midwest Test Facility, would rate higher than the mighty New York City (#53), home ofMashable HQ?

See how your city ranks, and feel free to trash-talk those other lesser bergs in the comments.

Most socially networked
1 Washington, DC A+
2 Atlanta, GA A+
3 Denver, CO A+
4 Minneapolis, MN A+
5 Seattle, WA A+
6 San Francisco, CA A
7 Orlando, FL A
8 Austin, TX A
9 Boston, MA A
10 Salt Lake City, UT A-

11 Cincinnati, OH A-
12 Raleigh, NC A-
13 Burlington, VT A-
14 Portland, OR B+
15 Madison, WI B+
16 Dallas, TX B+
17 Portland, ME B
18 Sacramento, CA B
19 Aurora, CO B
20 Boise, ID B
21 Charlotte, NC B
22 Wilmington, DE B
23 Oakland, CA B
24 St. Louis, MO B
25 Las Vegas, NV B
26 Columbus, OH B
27 San Diego, CA B
28 San Jose, CA B
29 St. Paul, MN B-
30 Plano, TX B-
31 Tampa, FL B-
32 Nashville, TN B-
33 Los Angeles, CA B-
34 Phoenix, AZ B-
35 Newark, NJ B-
36 Miami, FL B-
37 Norfolk, VA C+
38 Richmond, VA C+
39 Chicago, IL C+
40 Durham, NC C+
41 Colorado Springs, CO C+
42 Des Moines, IA C+
43 Jersey City, NJ C+
44 Indianapolis, IN C+
45 Milwaukee, WI C+
46 Fargo, ND C+
47 Columbia, SC C+
48 Houston, TX C+
49 Philadelphia, PA C+
50 Birmingham, AL C+
51 Cleveland, OH C+
52 Kansas City, MO C
53 New York, NY C
54 Greensboro, NC C
55 Reno, NV C
56 Manchester, NH C
57 Providence, RI C
58 Baltimore, MD C
59 Little Rock, AR C
60 Louisville, KY C
61 Sioux Falls, SD C-
62 Omaha, NE C-
63 Pittsburgh, PA C-
64 Baton Rouge, LA C-
65 Lexington, KY C
66 Wichita, KS C-
67 Anchorage, AK C-
68 Lincoln, NE C-
69 Cheyenne, WY D+
70 New Orleans, LA D+
71 Tucson, AZ D+
72 Buffalo, NY D+
73 Honolulu, HI D+
74 Santa Ana, CA D+
75 Charleston, WV D+
76 Oklahoma City, OK D+
77 Virginia Beach, VA D+
78 Winston-Salem, NC D+
79 Tulsa, OK D+
80 Albuquerque, NM D
81 Fort Worth, TX D
82 San Antonio, TX D
83 Jackson, MS D
84 Chesapeake, VA D
85 Jacksonville, FL D
86 Riverside, CA D
87 Memphis, TN D-
88 St. Petersburg, FL D-
89 Toledo, OH D-
90 Corpus Christi, TX D-

Least socially networked
91 Billings, MT D-
92 Fort Wayne, IN D-
93 Bridgeport, CT D-
94 Detroit, MI D-
95 Fresno, CA F
96 Bakersfield, CA F
97 Lubbock, TX F
98 Stockton, CA F
99 Laredo, TX F
100 El Paso, TX F

Source: http://mashable.com/2011/03/19/top-100-cities/

 

 

El Paso “Least Socially Networked City”

NetProspex in StantonMagazine

Mar 17, 2011, By Amy

It turns out that Men’s Health, a magazine that once ranked El Paso as the 27th most-sex-happy city, has a quite a different opinion of the Sun City when it comes to social networking. Thanks to a reader tip, TSM found out that El Paso was officially given a score of ‘F’ and placed dead last out of 100 cities when it came to finding the most socially-networked cities in America. The magazine notes that the findings were determined through sampling and statistical analysis:

“We started by calculating the number of Facebook and LinkedIn users per capita, followed by overall Twitter usage (NetProspex). Then we looked at traffic generated by the major social networks, including Myspace, Friendster, Reddit, and Digg (analyzed by ad network Chitika). Finally, after factoring in the percentage of households that check out chat rooms and blogs (SimplyMap), we had the results you see below.”

The news of such a ranking can’t be more heart wrenching than for the El Paso Convention and Visitors Bureau. The city announced today that it is vying to host the Social Media Tourism Symposium this fall. Hopefully the organizers don’t read Men’s Health.

At the end of the day, as a magazine that thrives off of social networking sites like Facebook and Twitter, we may have a different perception. After all, over half of you will find this article by clicking on a link you see one a major social networking platform. Many of you will also share the link to this post on your wall or ‘RT’ with some commentary of your own thereby referring even more users via the same avenue. But then again, you are the socially-networked few who have kept us from falling off the list altogether. What about the rest of El Paso. What can our city do to promote social networking? In a world where 1 out of every 7 people on the planet have a Facebook, what’s holding us back?

Source: http://thestantonmagazine.com/2011/03/el-paso-least-socially-networked-city/

 

Kansas City Receives Grade On Social Media Usage

NetProspex on KCTV

3-15-2011

It wasn’t a gleaming review of Kansas City’s social media capabilities but it was a review, nonetheless, that’s captured conversation among Twitter and Facebook users.
Men’s Health rated Kansas City No. 52 and gave a C-minus when it came to social media users. The article cited Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn usage, as well as traffic on MySpace, Friendster and Digg, a blogging site.
Skeptics question whether those examples are fair.
“They were getting into the weeds a little bit and looking at some of the blogs — and Digg and some of those other sites that weren’t nearly as common,” Adam Crowe, a tweeter from Johnson County’s Emergency Management Department, said.
Crowe uses Twitter to keep Johnson County residents informed on public safety issues. He’s also part of the Social Media Club of KC, a group that’s gotten international recognition.
“Did it capture truly the metropolitan area or is it only polling from truly Kansas City, Mo., which is a very limited area as a whole,” Social Media Club of KC Chairman Lisa Qualls said.
SMCKC is 1,600 members strong and is considered one of the top 10 social media clubs in the world. It’s a group that remains highly skeptical of the Men’s Health article but does admit there’s always room to grow.
“From a business perspective, our corporations here have always been a little more conservative, especially being from the Midwest. So, where we’re strong on the personal adoption, I think we can have a lot of growth on the business side,” Qualls said.

The list was figured by Men’s Health by calculating the number of Facebook and LinkedIn users per capita, followed by overall Twitter usage (NetProspex). Then they looked at traffic generated by the major social networks, including Myspace, Friendster, Reddit, and Digg (analyzed by ad network Chitika). Finally, the magazine factoring in the percentage of households that check out chat rooms and blogs (SimplyMap).
Most socially networked 1 Washington A+ 2 Atlanta A+ 3 Denver A+ 4 Minneapolis A+ 5 Seattle A+ 6 San Francisco A 7 Orlando A 8 Austin A 9 Boston A 10 Salt Lake City A- 11 Cincinnati A- 12 Raleigh A- 13 Burlington A- 14 Portland B+ 15 Madison B+ 16 Dallas B+ 17 Portland B 18 Sacramento B 19 Aurora B 20 Boise B 21 Charlotte B 22 Wilmington B 23 Oakland B 24 St. Louis B 25 Las Vegas B 26 Columbus B 27 San Diego B 28 San Jose B 29 St. Paul B- 30 Plano B- 31 Tampa B- 32 Nashville B- 33 Los Angeles B- 34 Phoenix B- 35 Newark B- 36 Miami B- 37 Norfolk C+ 38 Richmond C+ 39 Chicago C+ 40 Durham C+ 41 Colorado Springs C+ 42 Des Moines C+ 43 Jersey City C+ 44 Indianapolis C+ 45 Milwaukee C+ 46 Fargo C+ 47 Columbia C+ 48 Houston C+ 49 Philadelphia C+ 50 Birmingham C+ 51 Cleveland C+ 52 Kansas City C 53 New York C 54 Greensboro C 55 Reno C 56 Manchester C 57 Providence C 58 Baltimore C 59 Little Rock C 60 Louisville C 61 Sioux Falls C- 62 Omaha C- 63 Pittsburgh C- 64 Baton Rouge C- 65 Lexington C 66 Wichita C- 67 Anchorage C- 68 Lincoln C- 69 Cheyenne D+ 70 New Orleans D+ 71 Tucson D+ 72 Buffalo D+ 73 Honolulu D+ 74 Santa Ana D+ 75 Charleston D+ 76 Oklahoma City D+ 77 Virginia Beach D+ 78 Winston-Salem D+ 79 Tulsa D+ 80 Albuquerque D 81 Fort Worth D 82 San Antonio, D 83 Jackson D 84 Chesapeake D 85 Jacksonville D 86 Riverside D 87 Memphis D- 88 St. Petersburg D- 89 Toledo D- 90 Corpus Christi D- 91 Billings, MT D- 92 Fort Wayne D- 93 Bridgeport D- 94 Detroit D- 95 Fresno F 96 Bakersfield F 97 Lubbock F 98 Stockton F 99 Laredo F 100 El Paso F

Crowd-sourcing Ideas: A Complete B2B Reading List

NetProspex in iMedia Connection

Posted by Gary Halliwell on March 14th, 2011 at 12:36 pm

As the CEO of a venture-backed crowd-sourced business directory in Boston, I spend a lot of time talking to people about ideas and no less our staff, who are all continually coming up and executing on great ideas.

Sharing ideas and collaboration is at the root of creativity, so at NetProspex, we pay a lot of attention to this. In the spirit of sharing, I asked our team a simple question “What are you reading?” and similarly invite you to share with us and anyone reading the best books, blogs and video that you have come across in the comments section below.

1. The CEO

My recommendation is a perennial: “Wisdom of Crowds” by New Yorker business columnist James Suroweicki. His thoughts on the power of crowd-sourcing is at the heart of our ethos at NetProspex. This book is a great read and explains how pooling information from a large number of people tends towards the most accurate information.

(Link to: http://www.randomhouse.com/features/wisdomofcrowds/)

2. The Board of Advisors 

No surprise the most unusual recommendation is from Professor Ian Condry of MIT, who resides on our Board of Advisors. Ian recently returned from a sabbatical in Tokyo and came back with the amazing tale of virtual idol Hatsune Miku.  Miku started as a voice on music synthesizer software, which allows free use of the cartoon image of Miku.

As users created music and music videos featuring Miku, she became a hit online. Sega created a handheld video game featuring Miku which it is promoting with live concerts featuring a 3D hologram projection of Miku backed by a live band. She’s a pop phenomenon whose creativity and success was generated by users. That’s some crowd-souring!

(Link to: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DTXO7KGHtjI)

3. The Chief Revenue Officer

Our chief revenue officer, Michael Bird’s recommendation is “Connected: The Surprising Power of our Social Networks”.

If you are a social marketer, then this book by Harvard professors Christakis and Fowler is a must read. Forget six degrees of separation, a thirty year study of real communities show that influence and information travel only three degrees across our social networks. “That’s exciting and a critical piece of information for social marketing” says Mike.

(Link to: http://connectedthebook.com/)

4. The VP of Marketing

Our VP of Marketing Mark Feldman recommends another video, this time of Zappos CEO, Tony Hseih speaking at Google. “This is a really interesting take on how to scale a socially motivated company” says Mark.

(Link to: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jJ5k_Byd9Fs)

5. The VP of Sales

For a more personal tone, Tim Burns our VP of Sales recommends “My Quotable Kids a journal that is designed to capture all of the funny things our children say.  As Tim puts it “I spend a decent amount of time away from home, and I treasure the small amount of time I capture with my girls.  The unassuming honesty that comes from their world is one of the most treasured items to capture as keepsake memories.”

(Link to: http://www.amazon.com/My-Quotable-Kid-Parents-Unforgettable/dp/0811868842)

6. The Buzz Maker

Katie Martell, our Director of Buzz, recognizes an increasing trend of wonderful storytelling in marketing, and recommends reading Convergence Culture for inspiration on taking audiences on the journey of a brand across traditional and new media.

(Link to: http://www.amazon.com/Convergence-Culture-Where-Media-Collide/dp/0814742815)

She also recommends following the just-launched career of NYC’s new Chief Digital Officer @RachelSterne – tasked with the challenge of how to strategically use new media to connect the voices of the city’s inhabitants to its government.

(Link to http://www.twitter.com/RachelSterne )

7. The Director of Demand Generation

Vanessa Conde, our resident sales and marketing operations guru, is reading “Selling to the C-Suite: What Every Executive Wants You to Know About Successfully Selling to the Top” by Nicholas A.C. Read and Dr. Stephan J. Bistritz, on her Kindle no less.

(Link to http://www.sellingtothec-suite.com/)

8. The PR Agency

Matt Rizzetta, President and Founder of The North 6th Agency, is reading a lot about advertising, and recommends “King of Madison Avenue“, “Ogilvy on Advertising“, and “Hey Whipple“. Related to PR, he recommends “Punk Marketing” and “Putting the ‘Public’ Back in ‘Public Relations'”

(Link to King of Madison Avenue http://www.palgrave.com/products/title.aspx?pid=302756)

(Ogilvy on Advertising http://www.amazon.com/Ogilvy-Advertising-David/dp/039472903X)

(Hey Whipple http://www.amazon.com/Hey-Whipple-Squeeze-This-Advertising/dp/0470190736/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1269151763&sr=1-1&tag=533633855-20)

(Punk Marketing http://www.punkmarketing.com/think-punk/buy-the-book/)

(Public back http://www.amazon.com/Putting-Public-Back-Relations-Reinventing/dp/0137150695)

These are a few picks from many. Please share the books and videos that have moved you most in the past few months.  Let’s crowd-source some inspiration and creativity.”

Source: http://blogs.imediaconnection.com/blog/2011/03/14/crowd-sourcing-ideas-a-complete-b2b-reading-list/

 

Orlando Among America’s Most Socially Networked Cities

NetProspex in FTJ

By Florida Technology Journal Staff Report.

EMMAUS, PA – According to Men’s Health Magazine, Orlando is one of Americas most socially networked cities. Other Florida cities cracking the top 90, include Tampa at 31, Miami at 36 and St. Pete at 88.

Mens Health calculated the number of Facebook and LinkedIn users per capita, followed by overall Twitter usage (NetProspex). Then looked at traffic generated by the major social networks, including Myspace, Friendster, Reddit, and Digg (analyzed by ad network Chitika). Finally, after factoring in the percentage of households that check out chat rooms and blogs (SimplyMap).

Top 10 most socially networked
1 Washington, DC
2 Atlanta, GA
3 Denver, CO
4 Minneapolis, MN
5 Seattle, WA
6 San Francisco, CA
7 Orlando, FL
8 Austin, TX
9 Boston, MA
10 Salt Lake City, UT

Full article- http://www.floridatechnologyjournal.com/features/42-rokstories/849-orlando-among-americas-most-socially-networked-cities